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GhostIn the mid-sixties, a beautiful young woman attended the late Monday night movies at the Capitol Theatre, which resembled an Italian opera house in downtown Yakima, Washington.

She always met a man in the back rows and they exited the theatre to a waiting vintage automobile. One night, during the movie, Psycho, her body was discovered lying on the floor. She had been garroted and strangled to death. Her tragic death manifested her spirit into a ghost known as Therese, who terrified and charmed Rex Marvel, the young projectionist, into a relationship that was beyond the boundaries of the living.

The theatre manager, known as the wizard of Oz, Rex, Mike and Lt. Paganelli, YPD, brought the killers to justice but it came at a high price. When Therese attempted to bring Rex into her world of lost souls, he spurred her affections and she showed her anger at being scorned by causing the theatre fire of 1975.

Today, the restored Capitol Theatre is one of the premier Northwest showcases for stage entertainment. The book displays the beautiful artisan features of the interior of the theatre, such as murals depicting the four muses of comedy, tragedy, music and art painted on the dome over the seated area.

NEwThe men believed the ghost had been exorcised in the fire but they were wrong. Therese remains the Ghost of the Capitol Theatre. Included in the book is a CD of four tunes: The Shadow Of Your Smile, My Foolish Heart, Born To Be Wild and Speak Softly, Love.

 

St. JosephsIn the 1950s, St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, located near the downtown area of Yakima, served a blue-collar congregation, many of whom worked at Boise-Cascade Lumber Mill. One of the oldest churches in Yakima and the first Catholic Church in the city, St. Joseph’s was considered a mother church to her parishioners and to the citizens of Yakima. The parish has since shifted into an 80% Hispanic population and the church has been a spiritual home for all: a place for baptisms, confirmations, quinceaneras, weddings and holiday celebrations.

            Not just a building, St. Joseph’s was built by human hands using black basalt stone spewed out of volcanic lava found in Cowiche Canyon, twenty-miles from Yakima. The architecture had influences of Romanesque and Norman Gothic styles in the matching portico towers and spires with a barrel vault over the Baroque hand-carved main and side altars resplendent with carved statues. In the domed ceiling and through-out the church, Jesuit Brother Joseph Carignano, S.J. painted frescos that told visual stories from the Old and New Testaments as well as honoring noted saints. Fr. Neill Meany, S.J. and Robert Hill, famed N.W. artist, collaborated on designs for stained glass windows depicting the Holy Spirit, saints and doctrines of the Catholic Church.
            Parishioners felt a sense of jaw dropping awe and wonder at the museum quality of the nearly 100-year-old church’s interior before it was consumed in flames on July 30,1999 when a vagrant lit a match to find a shirt in the vestry and ignited a vestment. In panic, he fled the scene. The fire exploded and in the end, the church’s interior was charred and destroyed. Only the basalt stones and front doors of the façade remained as well as partial walls and stained glass remnants.
            Losing the church was likened to the death of a mother, the matriarch of the family. During the grieving period, Mass was celebrated in an empty Albertson’s grocery store. Some parishioners stayed. Some, who could not bear the death of their lifelong church, scattered to other parishes.
            Local and northwest architects and construction companies conferred. In this book, the reader will view a story revealed in photographs about a Phoenix literally rising out of the ashes of the past and into a church of renewed hope.

Features in the book include:

  • St. Joseph’s Mission at the Ahtanum
  • Pre-fire altar, stained glass windows and sacred art
  • The fire, the damage and the reconstruction
  • New stained glass windows and sacred art
  • Parishioner's Memories
  • A message from Bishop Carols Sevilla, S.J.
  • The Jesuits

You may also contact us directly to purchase any of these books.

 

In a combination of agricultural history and regional fiction, Lords of the Moxee Valley pays tribute to the romantic story of the Chanteur and Santos families.

In 1940, two hurricanes destroyed Victor Chanteur’s sugar cane crop in south Louisiana. Uncle Emile Chanteur in Moxee, Washington made him an offer he couldn’t refuse. “I will give you one hundred acres of my hop acreage, two houses, all the machinery and a kiln if you and your family will move here and farm my land, which cannot be sold until after I die.” Victor accepts the offer and, with his family, drives across the United States in an old bus to Moxee where he is taught how to grow hops by his uncle and Pepe, Emile’s Mexican foreman.

Pepe and Luna Santos live in a house provided by uncle Emile, within a hundred yards of “the big house.” The Chanteur and Santos children attend Holy Rosary Catholic School together and become lifelong friends. T-Luc Chanteur and Domingo Santos become spiritual brothers and provide adventure and high jinx similar to the antics of Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer.

When Valentina Chanteur, T-Luc’s sister, matures to a young woman, Domingo falls in love with her. The two are truly a modern day version of William Shakespeare’s lovers, Romeo and Juliet, who crossed the boundary between the feuding Montagues and Capulets of Verona, Italy.

The Moxee lovers’ relationship crosses the boundary between two cultures who had lived in a generational deadlock of proprietor and laborer. Only time would reveal the outcome of their Romeo and Juliet romance.

You may also contact us directly to purchase any of these books.

Lords of the Moxee Valley
 

After the tragic death of their mother, Jake, 14, became the protector and avenger of his brother, Levi, 12. The boys lived on a fruit orchard in Naches, WA with their father, Eli, and grandfather, John, and their second dad, Ron Porter, a cowboy and hunterís guide. Their grandmother was the only female figure in the male dominated Gunderson family as the boysí housekeeper and caregiver.

As a youngster, Jake won state trap and skeet competitions against men old enough to be his father. His quiet, intense manner turned into deadly rage when bullies at school harassed his brother and when a male hippie made a pass at Levi in Vanís Bar and Grill. Levi was not a hunter like the other men in his family. Rather he was a scientist, an environmentalist and a medical student.

Jakeís job as a Marine sniper on Hill 55 in South Vietnam was to eliminate Viet Cong troop leaders. Sgt. Champagne, a Cajun sniper from South Louisiana, assigned Jake to assassinate a VC terrorist, called Drazion Rouge, the Red Dragon, so named because of his blazing red hair, a legacy from his red headed American father and prostitute Vietnamese mother. After four years of being a killing machine in Vietnam, Jake tried to heal when he returned to the family farm.

Following their fatherís dramatic death, the brothers decided to go on a memorial hike in the South Cascade Mountains. As a hunterís guide, Jake looked forward to having his survival skills tested. He didnít count on his brotherís injury and a blood thirsty cougar who stalked the men, their two dogs and their mule.

Only an intervention from their second dad, Ron Porter, their grandfather and a U.S. Army Huey, called Golden Eagle, could the men be saved from their guaranteed peril in the wilds of the Northwestern wilderness.

The Brothers

 
The Waiting Room
EACH BOOK CONTAINS A CD - 4 SONGS
  • Sunrise, Sunset
  • Have I Told You Lately That I Love You
  • Let It Be
  • You’ll Never Walk Alone

Angel Solomon had been experiencing painful physical symptoms since she was twelve years old: migraine headaches, stomach aches, trouble breathing, flushing, flu-like symptoms. The doctors  refused to test her with a   MRI or CT scan. Instead, they told her mother that Angel was faking her illnesses and needed to see a counselor.

In spite of her occasional chronic pain, Angel became a singing and acting star in high school and college. Groupies followed her in between classes and townspeople asked her for her autograph.

Since the mainstream doctors ignored Angel’s mysterious symptoms, she turned to a shaman, who led her into a mythological world of counseling. A naturalpathic healer administered a drug program that involved overdoses of antibiotics, hormones and antifungals, which damaged Angel’s immune system. A near-death pontoon ride on the Colorado River and an auto accident further added to Angel’s medical crises.

Finally, Angel’s breathlessness alarmed doctors. Heart failure, carcinoid cancer tumors on her liver and A.R.D.S. left the doctors scratching their heads and saying “we’ll just have to wait and see” when Angel was still in serious condition after her open heart surgery at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. Only a MIRACLE could save Angel.

The Solomon family lived in the ICU waiting room for six weeks with other families who never   gave up Hope that God would save their critically ill family members even when the doctors predicted the worst. In THE WAITING ROOM you will meet Heart Man, The Sheik, Triangle Woman, Zoo Man, Mrs. Baptiste, Puzzle Man, Marlboro Man and Grandma, Senora Yanez, the P.R.A.Y. Group and R.E.I. Man. The denizens of the intensive care waiting room became one family, who helped each other endure the trauma of their loved ones standing at Heaven’s Gate.

 

TROUBADOUR, is a biography about Larry La Riviere, whose melodic voice brought him out of a life of poverty to reach the impossible dream of becoming a song writer, performing and recording artist. The book describes Larry’s life on Johnston Island destroying weapons of mass destruction. In 2002, Larry married Susan Marionneaux, a college professor who also wrote for a local newspaper. Together, they have co-written and recorded Cajun and zydeco songs in Louisiana.

Special features of TROUBADOUR include:

* A CD WITH 18 SONGS: Island songs, Cajun songs
* LYRICS FOR EACH SONG are inside the book
* CAJUN RECIPES
* DESCRIPTION OF RECORDING SESSIONS


Troubadour

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